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Alumni Accomplishments Winter 2018
Ward Horton ’94 in Torch Song


Ward Horton ’94

Ward Horton ’94 made his Broadway debut with the revival of Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song in November. He played Ed, a closeted teacher with whom the protagonist (played by Michael Urie) has a rocky relationship. In a “Critic’s Pick” review, The New York Times described Horton as “pitch perfect as an almost-straight man.”

Horton also appeared in the Off-Broadway run of Torch Song in 2017. He has had success on the small and big screens, including in the CBS medical drama Pure Genius and in the horror films Annabelle and Midnighters.

Photo by Emilio Madrid-Kuser

 


 

2018 Durham "I VOTED" Sticker by Josh Klein ’18

Josh Klein ’18

If you voted in Durham this fall, you’ll have received one of these sharp “I Voted” stickers designed by Josh Klein ’18, now a student at Georgetown University. His Durham flag-inspired design bested 29 others in a Durham County Board of Elections sticker contest. 

 


 

Malinda Maynor Lowery ’91

Malinda Maynor Lowery ’91

UNC Press recently published The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle by Malinda Maynor Lowery ’91. In the book, she chronicles the history of the Lumbee tribe while weaving in memories of her own Lumbee ancestors.

Lowery, also the author of Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South, is a history professor at UNC-Chapel Hill and director of the Center for the Study of the American South.

Photo by Joi Henslee

 


 

Anthony Roth Costanzo ’00


Anthony Roth Costanzo ’00, a star of both traditional opera and new music, received a 2019 Grammy nomination for his debut album, ARC, in the Best Classical Solo Vocal Album category. As he told Wall Street Journal Magazine, NPR and numerous other media outlets this fall, he’s on a quest to reimagine opera for a younger audience — or, as The New York Times put it, he “exists to transform opera.”

To build on ARC, Costanzo, a countertenor, is producing Glass Handel, an interdisciplinary performance combining the power of choreography, live artwork, videos, high fashion and the music of Handel and Philip Glass.

Photo by Dominic M. Mercier

 

View a music video from ARC

Listen to the full album
 


 

Anna Young

Anna Young ’12

Anna Young ’12, a doctoral student at Harvard University, co-authored a study on the toxicity of nail polish that shows even “non-toxic” polish may contain harmful chemicals. As she noted in the study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, current laws don’t require that beauty products be FDA-approved, and brands that claim to have safe formulations may be substituting some toxic chemicals with alternatives that are just as dangerous.

“It’s sort of like playing a game of chemical Whac-A-Mole, where one toxic chemical is removed and you end up chasing down the next potentially harmful chemical substituted in,” Young told Time magazine.

Read more in Time magazine
 


 

No. 1 from the series Care Free Black Girls, 2017 Photo by Faith Couch ’15

Faith Couch ’15

Photographs by Faith Couch ’15, a senior at Maryland Institute College of Art, are among those featured in the Nasher Museum of Art’s “Across County Lines: Contemporary Photography from the Piedmont” exhibition, running through Feb. 10. Also among the 39 photographers represented in the exhibition is DA Upper School photography teacher Harrison Haynes, who describes Couch as “gearing up to take the art world by storm.”

Photo by Faith Couch ’15 // No. 1 from the series Care Free Black Girls, 2017

 



Mike Wilkins ’77

Mike Wilkins ’77

Mike Wilkins ’77 received his third NBA championship ring as a minority owner of the Golden State Warriors in October.

Wilkins — who is also a minority owner of the Pittsburgh Steelers — is a wearer of many hats; he's a co-founder of Kingsford Capital Management (one of the best-regarded short-only firms with $250 million in assets) and has also been a screenwriter, author and artist. One of his pieces — “Preamble,” a collection of license plates spelling out the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution — is displayed at the Smithsonian American Art Museum as part of the permanent collection.